What to do after the exam?

We all know that AP classes (all of our classes, for that matter) are about the learning, and not the standardized test. We get it. We know it.

But we also know that we’ve crammed and studied and reviewed and stressed and motivated and encouraged… and it’s been about the test.

But school isn’t about tests, it’s about learning and growing. It’s about developing good habits and becoming good humans. So the learning can’t stop because the text has already happened.

But what are we to do?

I have about three weeks with my students after the AP Lang exam. We operate on a 90 minute block schedule, so I see them two to three times per week. That’s not a lot of meeting time between now and the last day of school.

I decided that I want my students to keep learning, growing, and developing as readers, writers, and thinkers, but I also want to honor all of the hard work and stress they’ve been under during these first couple of weeks of May.

The first idea I had was that we could read one last book together. But I didn’t want to choose the title for them, and I didn’t want to take class time to choose because we have so little left.

So then I thought, “Ah ha! Book clubs!” and started looking through my classroom library along with the list of what we have in our department book room, and I started getting excited. I ended up with a dozen titles I wanted to share with my students, and I realized that I have a dozen students in my AP Lang class (small class size is one of the many benefits of teaching outside of the US).

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I ended up choosing titles written by women of color. It just felt right. And I went with it.

As I was trying to figure out how to roll out this last unit of the school year without overloading and stressing out my students before the exam on Wednesday, I realized I wanted to make it fun. Exciting. Like an adventure, or one last gift of AP Lang reading before summer starts.

I wrapped the books in recycled anchor chart paper in order to make them a surprise, in order to build anticipation.

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I glued and taped descriptions of the books onto the wrapped books, but I removed any identifying details such as author, title, or other obvious clues about what the book really is. Instead of choosing based on author, title, cover, etc, they are going to choose based on a basic description copied from Amazon or Goodreads.

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On Tuesday, the day before the exam, we will meet as a class. I’ll bring in some fruit and muffins as a breakfast treat, they will pass the “mystery books” around to each other and collaboratively decide who gets which book. We’ll go over any last review questions and details they need, and we then be ready to come to class on Thursday, the day after the big exam, and quietly read, talk, and learn together. It won’t be a stressful, cramming, reviewing, worrying kind of class. It will be one where we recognize the importance of the AP exam, but also recognize that there is life and learning after the exam, and we should be looking ahead to it.

The summative assessment for this unit will likely be a graded video discussion. I’ll ask them to get into book clubs for these last few weeks and to talk about their individual books, trying to find themes and other things they can link between texts. If the students propose another idea for a summative assessment, I’m all ears. I respect their need for choice, and they deserve that someone listens to their voice. 

I’ll write again about how this all plays out, but so far, the students who have had the chance to preview the descriptions and who have an idea about what is coming their way after the exam have responded with enthusiasm. I think it’s safe to say we are all looking forward to this time together, without the focus on the exam, but instead, returning the focus to our reading and our reading lives.

What will your students study and learn after the exam? I’d love to hear how other classes move forward in the last few weeks of the school year.

Julie has been teaching secondary language arts for twenty years, spending the first fifteen in rural Central Oregon, and the last four in Amman, Jordan. She’s thrilled to report that she and her family have moved across the world to Managua, Nicaragua this year, where a new adventure has begun.

Follow her on twitter @SwinehartJulie

Author: adventuresinhighschoolworkshop

Julie has been teaching secondary language arts for nineteen years, spending the first fifteen in rural Central Oregon, four in Amman, Jordan, and is currently in her second year teaching in Managua, Nicaragua.

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