Book Talking the Newbery Honors and Winners with our Middle School Readers

Living in Nicaragua is amazing – it’s a beautiful country full of stunning volcanoes, unique wildlife, and lovely people. While there are many fantastic reasons to live here, it’s still sometimes a challenge to find new books for my classroom library. Luckily, my parents recently came for a visit, and before they travelled, they hit up some local second-hand shops and library sales. They ended up filling extra suitcases with 95 “new” books for our classroom library!

As I was shelving and organizing our new books, I noticed that there are several Newbery Honor and Winning books in our collection.

Newbery books
Brown Girl Dreaming, 2015; The Voice that Changed a Nation, 2005; Because of Winn-Dixie, 2001; The Ear the Eye and the Arm, 1995; The Thief, 1997; The Bronze Bow, 1962; The Egypt Game, 1968; Anpao, 1978; Miracles on Maple Hill, 1957; The Witch of Blackbird Pond, 1959; Hitty Her First Hundred Years, 1930; The Door in the Wall, 1950; Savvy, 2009; Walk Two Moons, 1995; The Giver, 1994; The Westing Game, 1979; The Dark Frigate, 1924; Indian Captive, 1942; Al Capone Does My Shirts, 2005; Dear Mr. Henshaw, 1984; The Crossover, 2015; The Trumpeter of Krakow, 1929; The Wanderer, 2001; The Road From Home, 1980

I also realized that I needed a quick way to get my seventh grade students familiar with the new titles.

I decided to pull all of the Newbery books and set them out on my students’ desks before they got to class. Between what I already had, and what was new, I had more than enough copies for every student to have at least one to learn about!

Instead of a book talk from me, I asked my students to get to know the book that was in front of them. After a few minutes with the book, they would pass it to the next person, and repeat the process a couple of times.

Anticipation had already been built for the new books before they even arrived, so when my students walked in to see new books on the desks, they were eager to get started.

I reminded my students what I include when I share our daily book talk:

  • I take a look at the cover and look for title, author, medals, and endorsements.
  • I read the inside flap or the back of the book.
  • I read the first sentence, paragraph, or page.
  • I check the publication date.
  • I read “about the author” if the option is there.
  • I look to see what the original language is, and if the book has been translated.

They jumped in, eager to look for the items we usually include in a book talk, but finding these items on their own, quietly. After a minute or two, they rotated books, and then repeated the process a couple of times.

After they had gotten to know three or four books, they partnered up with someone in the room who hadn’t had any of their same titles. That meant that with each partnership, there were six to eight titles they could discuss. I directed them to choose a partner A and a partner B, and that they would continue with a knee to knee conversation about the new titles in our classroom library.

By the time they were done with their conversations, they had each added a title or two to their Next Reads Lists, and some had even picked up a new book to start reading immediately.

While I love sharing nontraditional books with my seventh-grade students, I also think it’s important to share some of the classics and soon-to-be classics with them. This was a fun, quick, method for sharing several new, high-quality titles in an efficient way.

How do you ensure that you present a variety of titles to your students? I’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Julie has been teaching secondary language arts for twenty years, spending the first fifteen in rural Central Oregon, and the last four in Amman, Jordan. She’s thrilled to report that she and her family have moved across the world to Managua, Nicaragua this year, where a new adventure has begun.

Follow her on twitter @SwinehartJulie

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Author: adventuresinhighschoolworkshop

Julie has been teaching secondary language arts for nineteen years, spending the first fifteen in rural Central Oregon, and the last four in Amman, Jordan. She’s thrilled to report that she and her family will be moving across the agua to Managua, Nicaragua next year, where a new adventure will begin.

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