Three (very) Short Videos that Inspire Students to Read

One of the key components of the workshop model is the book talk. There are many different ways of organizing and presenting the daily book talk, but the main idea is that high interest books are presented to kids each and every day. It’s our job to make sure that the books we present are relevant, challenging, and fun to read.

I’ve had students tell me in the past that the reason they became better readers was because they found out that there were so many different options for reading in our library. That the daily book talks really work!Why book talk

This is the kind of feedback that keeps me investing in book talks. It’s an investment in the reading lives of my students.

One strategy I use when giving book talks is to let someone else do the talking. Media plays such an important role with today’s students that I think utilizing it in class is a great way to meet my students where they are. So I occasionally choose to show videos instead of simply talking about the books.

Last week I shared the trailer for HBO’s Fahrenheit 451. It wasn’t a book that was flying off of my shelves, but we have several copies from our department’s book room, and no one is teaching it as a whole-class text, so it’s fair game for our classroom libraries.

After showing the trailer for the new film, four students (in one class!) took it off the shelf and started reading it. And they like it.

Fahrenheit 451 Classroom Library

I loved that I had so many available copies. My students were able to experience the “instant gratification” of getting the book into their hands immediately.

That’s not always the case with our books, even though we have an amazing, robust selection of high interest books in both our classroom libraries and in the school collection.

One of those books that is now unexpectedly in high demand is A Wrinkle in Time. The movie comes out this weekend, so I showed the trailer in order to generate interest in the book and series. I don’t think a single one of my students had picked up that book so far this year, but after showing the trailer for the movie, I now have a waiting list of four for the book, and some others who had read the book in previous years have put the rest of the series on their next reads list.

A Wrinkle in Time Book Cover

The video that created the most hype (by far!) in my classroom so far this year is this interview with Jason Reynolds. I’m not sure what I was thinking, but I shared the video with my students before I had an actual copy of the book available for students. One of the complications of living internationally can be the ability to have things shipped right to our door, so it took me a while to get a physical copy of the book. I had students asking for Long Way Down for months before I got my hands on one, and there was an immediate waiting list.

Long Way Down Book Cover

So far, about a dozen of my ninth grade students have read it, and they love debating the ending of this book. It’s been a great success.

While I don’t recommend movie trailers as book talks every day, I do think they have a place in the rotation. They can be used in place of the teacher recommendation on days when teachers are out sick or when a student who has signed up for a book talk isn’t ready for some reason.

Movies can make challenging books more accessible by creating background knowledge, and interviews with the author (like the Jason Reynolds interview) create an energy that might be beyond my ability.

Encouraging and motivating my students to read high quality literature is the name of the game, and I believe that film can be a powerful gateway to a healthy reading life. If we want our students to work their way up their reading ladders, then it’s important to meet them on the steps where they currently are, and not to expect them to make immediate major leaps up to where we think they should be.

Being willing to meet kids at their level and interest empowers them to feel validated about their current reading lives, and to grow as readers, stepping up to the next rung of the ladder at the pace that makes sense for them. I believe that’s how we grow authentic, healthy, life long readers, and that using videos and film can be a useful tool in that journey.

How do you use videos in your classroom to motivate readers? I’d love to read about your strategies in the comments below.

Julie has been teaching secondary language arts for nineteen years, spending the first fifteen in rural Central Oregon, and the last four in Amman, Jordan. She’s thrilled to report that she and her family will be moving across the agua to Managua, Nicaragua next year, where a new adventure will begin.

Follow her on twitter @SwinehartJulie

Author: adventuresinhighschoolworkshop

Julie has been teaching secondary language arts for nineteen years, spending the first fifteen in rural Central Oregon, four in Amman, Jordan, and is currently in her second year teaching in Managua, Nicaragua.

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